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Psychosocial characteristics associated with frequent physical fighting: findings from the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

Authors
  • Swahn, Monica H
  • Bossarte, Robert M
  • Palmier, Jane B
  • Yao, Huang
  • Van Dulmen, Manfred H M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2013
Volume
19
Issue
2
Pages
143–146
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040381
PMID: 22962417
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The goal of the current study was to determine the prevalence and psychosocial correlates associated with frequent fighting among US high school students. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (N=16 410). Multivariate logistic regression analyses determined associations between demographic and psychosocial correlates of frequent fighting. Among students, 13.6% reported fighting once, 15.3% reported fighting 2-11 times and 2.6% reported fighting 12 or more times in the past year. Risk factors associated with frequent fighting were weapon carrying (adjusted OR=10.55; 95% CI 7.40 to 15.05), suicide attempt (adjusted OR=6.16; 95% CI 3.70 to 10.28), binge drinking (adjusted OR=3.15; 95% CI 2.16 to 4.59) and feeling too unsafe to go to school (adjusted OR=3.09; 95% CI 2.00 to 4.77). There is a clear need to better understand the patterns and psychosocial characteristics of frequent physical fighting and the prevention and interventions strategies that may be most relevant for these vulnerable youth.

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