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Psychopathological disorders in Prader-Willi syndrome.

Authors
  • Guinovart, Martí1
  • Coronas, Ramón2
  • Caixàs, Assumpta3
  • 1 Servicio de Salud Mental, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona), España.
  • 2 Servicio de Salud Mental, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona), España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid, España.
  • 3 Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona), España. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Endocrinologia, diabetes y nutricion
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
66
Issue
9
Pages
579–587
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.endinu.2019.03.004
PMID: 31006652
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
Spanish
License
Unknown

Abstract

Prader-Willi syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by chromosomal changes in segment 15q11-q13 including cognitive, mental, and behavioral symptoms, as well as a specific physical phenotype. Both the most common psychopathological changes (intellectual disability, obsessions, impulsivity, autism spectrum disorders, self-injuries) and the main psychiatric comorbidities (affective disorders, psychosis, obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism spectrum disorder) are characterized by a great heterogeneity, which warrants the need for better identification of their frequency and clinical signs. In addition to its effects on body compositionand hypotony, growth hormone has been shown to be useful for regulating patient behavior, and psychoactive drugs are also an option. Other alternatives have shown promising results in experimental trials. Adequate understanding of the psychopathology associated to Prader-Willi syndrome would allow for improving clinical approach, symptom identification, detection of comorbidities, and administration of more effective treatments, leading to better clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2019 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

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