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Psychometric evaluation of the Eating Disorders in Youth-Questionnaire when used in adults: Prevalence estimates for symptoms of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and population norms.

Authors
  • Hilbert, Anja1
  • Zenger, Markus1, 2
  • Eichler, Janina1
  • Brähler, Elmar1, 3
  • 1 Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Behavioral Medicine Research Unit, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Faculty of Applied Human Studies, University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg and Stendal, Stendal, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Eating Disorders
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
54
Issue
3
Pages
399–408
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/eat.23424
PMID: 33283329
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Restrictive eating behaviors occur across ages, but little is known about symptoms of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), especially in adults. This study sought to examine the prevalence of symptoms of ARFID in the adult population, providing a psychometric evaluation of the Eating Disorders in Youth-Questionnaire (EDY-Q) and population norms. In a representative survey of the German population, N = 2,424 adults (1,297 women, 1,127 men; age 49.5 ± 17.5 years) were assessed with the EDY-Q and measures of eating disorder and general psychopathology for divergent validation. The point prevalence of self-reported symptoms of ARFID amounted to 0.8% (20/2,424), with 0.8% of women (10/1,297) and 0.9% of men (10/1,127) being affected. Adults with symptoms of ARFID were significantly more likely to have underweight or normal weight, were more likely to report restrictive behaviors and lower levels of eating disorder psychopathology and binge eating than noneating-disordered controls and adults with symptoms of an eating disorder, but did not significantly differ in levels of compensatory behaviors, or depression and anxiety. The EDY-Q revealed favorable item statistics, heterogeneity, and satisfactory construct validity, including factorial, discriminant, and divergent validity. Weight-status specific norms were provided. Both women and men from the population reported symptoms of ARFID with an anthropometric and psychopathological profile similar to that seen in youth with symptoms of ARFID, however, with lower prevalence estimates, and distinctive from that in other eating disorders. Interview-based assessment of this symptomatology is required to confirm the prevalence of ARFID diagnosis. © 2020 The Authors. International Journal of Eating Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.

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