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[Psychological resistances of women to the principal female methods of contraception. Clinical classification].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta psychiatrica Belgica
Publication Date
Volume
75
Issue
1
Pages
49–73
Identifiers
PMID: 1232762
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Resistance to contraception was classified into sociocultural, medical psychological, and psychopathologic types. Normal sociocultural resistance includes ideas that contraception is unnatural, immoral, mutilating, or too much responsibility. Medical resistance either realistic, subjective, or objective fear of side effects, can occur before a woman begins contraception, e.g., fear of sterility, pain, or gynecologic exams, or resistance after experience with contraception, e.g., resistance due to frequent phychosomatic pill side effects. Psychological resistance may derive from desire for pregnancy, fear of loss of femininity, unresolved oedipal conflicts, need for a child for status, affection, creativity, or to cement a marital relationship. Normal female traits such as passivity, impulsive or irrational tendencies, laziness, fatalism and fear of change can contribute to resistance to contraception. Narcissism can generate resistance to the cost, inconvenience, or side effects such as loss of libido, weight gain, acne, or profuse menses caused by pills or IUDs. Pathological conduct that compromises contraception includes sexual inhibition, frigidity, homosexuality, phobias, obsessions, and hysteria. Women accustomed to tampons or douching and those who have experienced abortion or painless childbirth are less opposed to contraception. The attitudes and information conveyed by physicians, families, and partners are important in lessening contraceptive resistance.

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