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The psychological impact of orthognathic surgery: A 9-month follow-up

Authors
  • Kiyak, H.Asuman
  • West, Roger A.
  • Hohl, Thomas
  • McNeill, R.William
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Orthodontics
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1982
Volume
81
Issue
5
Pages
404–412
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0002-9416(82)90078-1
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In an attempt to determine the impact of surgical orthodontics on patients' personality and perceptions of oral function, fifty-five patients were examined longitudinally. Patients completed five questionnaires during the course of treatment, from 1 month before to 9 months after surgery. Orthodontic appliances were still being worn by 56.1 percent at the 9-month assessment. Satisfaction with surgery, self-esteem, and body image were high throughout the postsurgical stage but showed significant changes. Satisfaction peaked at 4 months but declined at 9 months postsurgery, as did self-esteem and facial body image. Most of this decline was attributable to patients being still under orthodontic treatment, but those with continuing problems of pain, paresthesia, and oral dysfunction were not more likely to report psychological dissatisfaction. Results are examined from the perspectives of integration of body image and patient expectations from orthognathic surgery.

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