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Providing men at risk of suicide with emotional support and advice with employment, housing and financial difficulties: a qualitative evaluation of the Hope service.

Authors
  • Farr, Michelle1, 2
  • Mamluk, Loubaba1, 2
  • Jackson, Joni1, 2
  • Redaniel, Maria Theresa1, 2
  • O'Brien, Marina3
  • Morgan, Rebecca3
  • Costello, Christian3
  • Spencer, Jez4
  • Banks, Jonathan1, 2
  • 1 The National Institute for Health and Care Research Applied Research Collaboration West (NIHR ARC West) at University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
  • 2 Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
  • 3 Second Step, Suicide Prevention and Post-Vention Services, Bristol, UK.
  • 4 6188 Ltd., Suicide Prevention and Intervention Trainer, Bristol, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of mental health (Abingdon, England)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
33
Issue
1
Pages
3–13
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09638237.2022.2091756
PMID: 35830874
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Men at risk of suicide often face difficulties with finances, employment, or housing, yet support services are usually psychologically based. This study evaluated the Hope service which provides integrated psychosocial support alongside practical, financial and specialist advice. To examine how the Hope service supports men at risk of suicide and factors that influence its impact and usefulness. Twenty-six qualitative interviews with 16 service users, six Hope staff, two specialist money advice workers funded to work for Hope and two NHS referral staff, thematically analysed. The Hope service provided an essential service for men at risk of suicide, with complex needs including addiction, job loss, homelessness, debt, relationship-breakdown and bereavement who often would otherwise have fallen through service provision gaps. Working in a person-centred, non-judgemental way elicited trust and specialist advice tackled problems such as housing needs, debt, benefit claims and employment, enabling men to regain a sense of control over their lives. Some men shared histories of abuse, for which specialist counselling was hard to access. Hope provides an effective integrated support package for suicidal men. Funding for services like Hope are important to tackle structural issues such as homelessness and debt, alongside emotional support.

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