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Provider perceptions of systems-level barriers and facilitators to utilizing family-based treatment approaches in adolescent and young adult opioid use disorder treatment.

Authors
  • Pielech, Melissa1, 2
  • Modrowski, Crosby3, 4
  • Yeh, Jasper5
  • Clark, Melissa A6
  • Marshall, Brandon D L7
  • Beaudoin, Francesca L7, 8
  • Becker, Sara J9
  • Miranda, Robert Jr3, 5, 10
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, 02912, USA. [email protected].
  • 2 Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA. [email protected].
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.
  • 4 Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 5 Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 6 Department of Health Services Policy & Practice, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 7 Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 8 Department of Emergency Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 9 Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science, Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 10 E. P. Bradley Hospital, Riverside, RI, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Addiction science & clinical practice
Publication Date
Mar 21, 2024
Volume
19
Issue
1
Pages
20–20
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s13722-024-00437-x
PMID: 38515214
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Amidst increasing opioid-related fatalities in adolescents and young adults (AYA), there is an urgent need to enhance the quality and availability of developmentally appropriate, evidence-based treatments for opioid use disorder (OUD) and improve youth engagement in treatment. Involving families in treatment planning and therapy augments medication-based OUD treatment for AYA by increasing treatment engagement and retention. Yet, uptake of family-involved treatment for OUD remains low. This study examined systems-level barriers and facilitators to integrating families in AYA OUD treatment in Rhode Island. An online survey was administered to clinic leaders and direct care providers who work with AYA in programs that provide medication and psychosocial treatments for OUD. The survey assessed attitudes towards and experiences with family-based treatment, barriers and facilitators to family-based treatment utilization, as well as other available treatment services for AYA and family members. Findings were summarized using descriptive statistics. A total of 104 respondents from 14 distinct treatment programs completed the survey. Most identified as White (72.5%), female (72.7%), and between 25 and 44 years of age (59.4%). Over half (54.1%) of respondents reported no experience with family based treatment and limited current opportunities to involve families. Barriers perceived as most impactful to adopting family-based treatment were related to limited available resources (i.e. for staff training, program expansion) and lack of prioritization of family-based treatment in staff productivity requirements. Barriers perceived as least impactful were respondent beliefs and attitudes about family-based treatment (e.g., perception of the evidence strength and quality of family-based treatment, interest in implementing family-based treatment) as well as leadership support of family-based treatment approaches. Respondents identified several other gaps in availability of comprehensive treatment services, especially for adolescents (e.g. services that increase social recovery capital). Family-based treatment opportunities for AYA with OUD in Rhode Island are limited. Affordable and accessible training programs are needed to increase provider familiarity and competency with family-based treatment. Implementation of programming to increase family involvement in treatment (i.e. psychoeducational and skills-based groups for family members) rather than adopting a family-based treatment model may be a more feasible step to better meet the needs of AYA with OUD. not applicable. © 2024. The Author(s).

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