Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Proteus Effect Profiles: how Do they Relate with Disordered Gaming Behaviours?

Authors
  • Stavropoulos, Vasileios1
  • Pontes, Halley M2, 3
  • Gomez, Rapson4
  • Schivinski, Bruno5
  • Griffiths, Mark6
  • 1 Victoria University, Footscray, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 University of Tasmania, School of Psychological Sciences, Newnham Campus, Building O, Launceston, TAS, 7250, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 The International Cyberpsychology and Addictions Research Laboratory (iCARL), University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, 7250, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychiatric Quarterly
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
91
Issue
3
Pages
615–628
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11126-020-09727-4
PMID: 32140972
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Gamers represent themselves in online gaming worlds through their avatars. The term "Proteus Effect" (PE) defines the potential influences of the gamers' avatars on their demeanour, perception and conduct and has been linked with excessive gaming. There is a significant lack of knowledge regarding likely distinct PE profiles and whether these could be differentially implicated with disordered gaming. A normative group of 1022 World of Warcraft (WoW) gamers were assessed in the present study (Mean age = 28.60 years). The Proteus Effect Scale (PES) was used to evaluate the possible avatar effect on gamers' conduct, and the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale-Short-Form was used to examine gaming disorder behaviors. Latent class profiling resulted in three distinct PE classes, 'non-influenced-gamers' (NIGs), 'perception-cognition-influenced-gamers' (PCIGs), and 'emotion-behaviour-influenced-gamers' (EBIGs). The NIGs reported low rates across all PES items. The PCIGs indicated higher avatar influence in their perception-experience but did not report being affected emotionally. The EBIGs indicated significantly higher avatar influence in their emotion and behaviour than the other two classes but reported stability in their perception of aspects independent of their avatar. Gaming disorder behaviours were reduced for the NIGs and progressively increased for the PCIGs and the EBIGs.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times