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Protein localization screening in vivo reveals novel regulators of multiciliated cell development and function.

Authors
  • Tu, Fan1
  • Sedzinski, Jakub1, 2
  • Ma, Yun1, 3
  • Marcotte, Edward M1
  • Wallingford, John B4
  • 1 Dept. of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
  • 2 The Danish Stem Cell Centre (DanStem), University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 3 The Otorhinolaryngology Hospital, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou, P.R. China. , (China)
  • 4 Dept. of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cell Science
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Jan 29, 2018
Volume
131
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jcs.206565
PMID: 29180514
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Multiciliated cells (MCCs) drive fluid flow in diverse tubular organs and are essential for the development and homeostasis of the vertebrate central nervous system, airway and reproductive tracts. These cells are characterized by dozens or hundreds of motile cilia that beat in a coordinated and polarized manner. In recent years, genomic studies have not only elucidated the transcriptional hierarchy for MCC specification but also identified myriad new proteins that govern MCC ciliogenesis, cilia beating and cilia polarization. Interestingly, this burst of genomic data has also highlighted that proteins with no obvious role in cilia do, in fact, have important ciliary functions. Understanding the function of proteins with little prior history of study presents a special challenge, especially when faced with large numbers of such proteins. Here, we define the subcellular localization in MCCs of ∼200 proteins not previously implicated in cilia biology. Functional analyses arising from the screen provide novel links between actin cytoskeleton and MCC ciliogenesis. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

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