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Protective immunity after COVID-19 has been questioned: What can we do without SARS-CoV-2-IgG detection?

Authors
  • Melgaço, Juliana Gil1
  • Azamor, Tamiris2
  • Ano Bom, Ana Paula Dinis2
  • 1 Laboratory of Immunological Technology, Immunobiological Technology Institute, Bio-Manguinhos, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Brazil)
  • 2 Laboratory of Immunological Technology, Immunobiological Technology Institute, Bio-Manguinhos, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cellular Immunology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Apr 28, 2020
Volume
353
Pages
104114–104114
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2020.104114
PMID: 32361409
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) induces a severe acute respiratory syndrome that is called COVID-19. Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 include diarrhea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, exhausted lymphocytes, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Immunology is part of the process of clinical evolution, but there are some questions around immunity-based protection: (1) why some infected people have only mild symptoms of the disease or are asymptomatic; (2) why delayed and weak antibody responses are associated with severe outcomes; and (3) why positivity in molecular tests does not represent protective antibody IgG. Perhaps T cell responses may be the key to solving those questions. SARS-CoV-2-specific memory T cells persist in peripheral blood and may be capable of providing effective information about protective immunity. The T cells studies can be helpful in elucidating the pathways for development of vaccines, therapies, and diagnostics for COVID-19 and for filling these immunology knowledge gaps. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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