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Prosthodontic implications of saliva and salivary gland dysfunction.

Authors
  • Khoury, Zaid H1
  • Sultan, Ahmed S2, 3
  • 1 Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences and Research, Meharry Medical College, School of Dentistry, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • 2 Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • 3 University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of prosthodontics : official journal of the American College of Prosthodontists
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2023
Volume
32
Issue
9
Pages
766–775
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jopr.13725
PMID: 37302138
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To provide a detailed overview of the fundamentals of saliva constituents and production. The review outlines the clinical manifestations as a consequence of salivary gland dysfunction and management strategies for patients with salivary gland dysfunction. Prosthodontic implications of saliva and salivary gland dysfunction are presented. English-language literature relating to saliva constituents, physiologic saliva production, clinical manifestations secondary to salivary gland dysfunction, salivary biomarkers, and management strategies were retrieved via electronic search. Relevant articles were summarized for this manuscript with a view toward providing pragmatic information. Saliva is produced by three pairs of major and minor salivary glands. The major salivary glands, namely, the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands, contribute approximately 90% of saliva production. Saliva contains serous and mucinous secretions produced by different types of cells within salivary glands. Parasympathetic and sympathetic fibers innervate the major salivary glands, and upon stimulation, the parasympathetic innervation increases serous secretions, while the sympathetic innervation increases protein secretion. Stimulated saliva is mainly derived from the parotid glands which are composed of serous acini, while unstimulated saliva is mainly derived from the submandibular glands which are composed of mixed seromucous acini. As major salivary glands contribute the most to salivary flow, local or systemic factors influencing those glands can disrupt saliva production resulting in clinically significant oral manifestations. This review provides a fundamental overview of saliva production. In addition, the review highlights the various clinical manifestations secondary to salivary gland dysfunction, explores salivary biomarkers for screening of systemic diseases, discusses management strategies for patients with salivary gland dysfunction, and outlines the prosthodontic implications of saliva and salivary gland dysfunction. © 2023 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

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