Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Prospective study of the occurrence of psychological disorders and comorbidities after spinal cord injury.

Authors
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1 John Walsh Center for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 Australian College of Applied Psychology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Social Sciences and Psychology, The University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 John Walsh Center for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 John Walsh Center for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Key University Center for Health Technologies, University of Technology, Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Spinal Cord Injury Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Spinal Cord Injury Unit, Royal Rehabilitation Center, Sydney, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
1532-821X
Publication Date
Volume
96
Issue
8
Pages
1426–1434
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.027
PMID: 25778773
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

SCI can have a substantial negative impact on mental health that does not change up to 6 months postdischarge. Findings suggest a substantial minority experience increased psychosocial distress after the injury and after transitioning into the community. Additional resources should be invested in improving the mental health of adults with SCI.

Statistics

Seen <100 times