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A prospective study of cancer-related benefit finding in uveal melanoma patients.

Authors
  • Herts, Kate L1
  • Jorge-Miller, Alexandra2
  • Beran, Tammy M3
  • McCannel, Tara A4
  • Wiley, Joshua F5
  • Stanton, Annette L6
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 3 Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Ophthalmology and Stein Eye Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 5 Monash Institute for Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences and School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry/Biobehavioral Sciences, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1563, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
1
Pages
131–137
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-020-00175-w
PMID: 32939680
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Little is known about contributors to the psychosocial impact of uveal melanoma, a rare cancer. Predictors and outcomes of benefit finding, a potentially favorable outcome, were investigated. Adults (n = 107) completed assessments prior to diagnosis of uveal melanoma and one week, three months and 12 months after diagnosis. Path analyses with the full information maximum likelihood estimation method were conducted. Objective disease impact on vision did not predict benefit finding (p > .05). Approach-oriented coping prior to diagnosis and one week later significantly predicted greater benefit finding 12 months later (p < .01). Avoidance-oriented coping at three months moderated the concurrent relationship of benefit finding and positive affect at 12 months (p < .001). This first study of predictors of benefit finding in uveal melanoma patients suggests that greater approach-oriented coping prospectively predicts higher benefit finding. Further, avoidance may condition the association of benefit finding with psychosocial outcomes.

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