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Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
1662-5161
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Volume
8
Pages
961–961
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00961
PMID: 25505402
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Movement disorders (MDs) are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson's disease) and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia), suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with MDs, and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using "task-intrinsic" or "augmented feedback." This perspective article reviews the available evidence on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with MDs and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

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