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Promoting self-management of urinary incontinence in a geropsychiatric day treatment program.

Authors
  • Jones, Denise
  • Perese, Eris F
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
Publication Date
May 01, 2003
Volume
41
Issue
5
Pages
38–43
Identifiers
PMID: 12743965
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

As the number of older adults in the United States increases, the number of older adults with mental illnesses also will increase. There will be a corresponding increase in prevalence of UI and its associated problems--medical problems, loss of independence or need for institutionalized care, diminished quality of life, and increased costs. Psychiatric nurses are in a position to help older adults with mental illnesses improve their overall health and quality of life by preventing the problems associated with untreated UI. Within their practice, psychiatric nurses have the opportunity to ensure clients receive the comprehensive assessments needed to establish their functional, physical, behavioral, emotional, and social support status--information that forms the foundation for developing individualized treatment interventions. Psychiatric nurses have the expertise to integrate physical and mental health care for older adults with mental illnesses and co-occurring conditions, such as UI. Promoting self-management of UI among older adults with mental illnesses potentially will enable them to participate in psychiatric rehabilitation programs; improve their overall health and quality of life; prevent falls and fractures that often cause them to lose their independent community living status and to be admitted to long-term care facilities; and reduce the cost to mental health care providers of managing UI in the treatment setting.

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