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Prometheus, Epimetheus and Pandora: from Athenian pottery to satyr-plays and cult

Authors
  • Williams, Dyfri
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Source
HAL-UPMC
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

This article examines representations of Prometheus and Epimetheus on Athenian vases from after the Persian Wars until the end of the fifth century BC, touching on the interplay with both Athenian satyr drama and cult. It begins with possible dramatic connections between Prometheus and Hephaistos, as seen from four vases, linking them tentatively with a satyr play, such as Aeschylus’ <i>Prometheus</i> (473/2 BC). The dressing of Pandora and her summoning are next considered and possible connections with Sophokles’ <i>Pandora or the Hammerers</i> discussed. Pandora’s “jar of evils” is also introduced and a previously unrecognized representation of the jar inside a chest revealed. Finally, it is suggested that the scenes involving Prometheus and Epimetheus in representations of cult in the last third of the fifth century indicate an increased profile for the pair at Athens, one that confirmed their reconciliation with Zeus and the other Olympian gods in the minds of Athenians.

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