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Prolonged seated immobility at work is a common risk factor for venous thromboembolism leading to hospital admission.

Authors
  • Aldington, S
  • Pritchard, A
  • Perrin, K
  • James, K
  • Wijesinghe, M
  • Beasley, R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Internal medicine journal
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2008
Volume
38
Issue
2
Pages
133–135
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2007.01597.x
PMID: 18290829
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The role of seated immobility at work in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uncertain. In this case series, 61 patients aged <65 years with a recent admission for deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire to obtain information regarding risk factors. Prolonged seated immobility at work in the 4 weeks before the VTE event was defined as being seated at least 8 h in a 24-h period and at least 3 h at a time without getting up, at least 10 h in a 24-h period and at least 2 h at a time without getting up or at least 12 h in a 24-h period and at least 1 h at a time without getting up. The most commonly identified risk factors were family history of VTE (21 of 61, 34%), seated immobility at work (21 of 61, 34%) and a thrombophilic state (19 of 61, 31%). We conclude that prolonged seated immobility at work may represent a common and important risk factor for VTE.

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