Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Prognostic value of the extent of lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer-specific survival among T1 patients

Authors
  • Wang, Yang1
  • Zhang, Xiangwei1
  • Zhang, Xiufeng2
  • Liu-Helmersson, Jing3
  • Zhang, Lin1
  • Xiao, Wen1
  • Jiang, Yuanzhu1
  • Liu, Keke1
  • Sang, Shaowei4, 5, 6
  • 1 Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, Jinan, 250021, People’s Republic of China , Jinan (China)
  • 2 Shandong Public Health Clinical Center, Jinan, 250013, People’s Republic of China , Jinan (China)
  • 3 Umea University, Umea, SE-901 85, Sweden , Umea (Sweden)
  • 4 Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, 107 Wenhua Road, Jinan, Lixia District, 250012, People’s Republic of China , Jinan (China)
  • 5 Clinical Research Center of Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, People’s Republic of China , Jinan (China)
  • 6 Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China , Jinan (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Cancer
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Apr 14, 2021
Volume
21
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s12885-021-08080-4
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundClinically, there are no clear guidelines on the extent of lymphadenectomy in patients with T1 esophageal cancer. Studying the minimum number of lymph nodes for resection may increase cancer-specific survival.MethodsPatients who underwent esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy at T1 stage were selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (United States, 1998–2014). Maximally selected rank and Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine three variables: the number of lymph nodes examined, the number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio.ResultsApproximately 18% had lymph node metastases, where the median values were 10, 10 and 0 for the number of lymph nodes examined, the number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio, respectively. All three examined variables were statistically associated with cancer-specific survival probability. Dividing patients into two groups shows a clear difference in cancer-specific survival compared to four or five groups for all three variables: there was a 29% decrease in the risk of death with the number of lymph nodes examined ≥14 vs < 14 (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval: 0.57–0.89), a 35% decrease in the risk of death with the number of negative lymph nodes ≥13 vs < 13 (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.52–0.81), and an increase of 1.21 times in the risk of death (hazard ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.76–2.77) for the lymph node ratio > 0.05 vs ≤ 0.05.ConclusionsThe extent of lymph node dissection is associated with cancer-specific survival, and the minimum number of lymph nodes that need to be removed is 14. The number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio also have prognostic value after lymphadenectomy among T1 stage patients.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times