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PROGNOSTIC INDICATORS FOR SURVIVAL OF ORPHANED NEONATAL AND JUVENILE EASTERN COTTONTAIL RABBITS (SYLVILAGUS FLORIDANUS): 1,256 CASES (2012-17).

Authors
  • Principati, Stephanie L1, 2
  • Keller, Krista A1
  • Allender, Matthew C1
  • Reich, Sarah1
  • Whittington, Julia1
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61802, USA.
  • 2 Current address: Radnor Veterinary Hospital, 107 N Aberdeen Avenue, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19807, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of wildlife diseases
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
56
Issue
3
Pages
523–529
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7589/2019-06-146
PMID: 31895643
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Orphaned eastern cottontail rabbits (ECRs; Sylvilagus floridanus) often present to wildlife clinics within their geographic range and require considerable dedication of time and resources. The objective of this analytical cross-sectional study was to assess initial examination findings to be used as prognostic indicators for orphaned neonatal and juvenile ECRs. The medical records of the University of Illinois Wildlife Medical Clinic were searched for ECRs presenting between 2012 and 2018. This criterion identified 1,256 ECRs that were then classified as survivors (survived and released) or as nonsurvivors (euthanized or natural death) within 72 h of admission. Presenting weight, body system abnormalities, hydration status, intervention prior to presentation, and singleton versus group presentation were categorically recorded for each individual ECR. The data were modeled using a series of logistic regression models fitted using the general linear model. Individuals were significantly more likely to be nonsurvivors if they presented as singletons (P<0.0001), presented with moderate/severe (P<0.001) or mild integumentary signs (P=0.0261), presented with multi-organ disease (P<0.001), presented with neurologic signs (P<0.0003), or had treatment provided prior to presentation (P=0.031). Factors that did not predict survival status in ECRs included body weight (P=0.210), presence of respiratory signs (P=0.674), and presence of dehydration (P=0.356). These findings may be used at wildlife medical clinics to make triage criteria for euthanasia as well as dedicate limited funds and labor to cases with the best prognosis for survival.

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