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[Prognostic factors in selected stab injuries of the posterior eye segment].

Authors
  • von Rückmann, A
  • von Rückmann, B
  • Fries, U
  • Schnaudigel, O E
Type
Published Article
Journal
Der Ophthalmologe : Zeitschrift der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1995
Volume
92
Issue
5
Pages
714–716
Identifiers
PMID: 8751003
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Vitreoretinal proliferation (PVR) is an important cause of severe visual loss in eyes with penetrating injuries. The aim of this work was to study the occurrence of early signs of PVR in eyes with penetrating injuries and no indication for vitrectomy within the first 14 days and to identify the factor that correlates most with high incidence and early onset of PVR. Furthermore, the aggressiveness of PVR in this group of patients was studied. We examined 51 patients (mean age 36 years) with penetrating ocular injuries using indirect ophthalmoscopy and B- and A/B-scan-echography. The mean follow-up interval was 24 months. The factor that correlated most with high incidence and early onset of PVR was a scleral laceration length of > 6 mm. The incidence of PVR was at any time significantly higher in eyes with a scleral laceration length of > 6 mm than in eyes with a scleral laceration length of < 6 mm (P < 0.0313). A negative correlation was shown between the length of the scleral laceration and the time of onset of PVR (r = 0.3441; P = 0.0006). Four eyes (8%) underwent vitrectomy because of aggressive development of PVR. A scleral laceration length of > 6 mm is the most important risk factor for high incidence and early onset of PVR in eyes with penetrating injuries with no indication for vitrectomy within the first 14 days.

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