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Profiles of microorganisms isolated from neonates’ blood cultures, incubators, cradles, ventilators, washbasins, and health-workers of Libreville University Hospital Neonatal Service: focus on infection prevention and control measures

Authors
  • Kuissi Kamgaing, Eliane1, 2
  • Ndong, Jean-Charles3
  • Kouegnigan Rerambiah, Léonard4, 5
  • Djoba Siawaya, Joel Fleury3, 4
  • 1 CHU- Mère-Enfant Fondation Jeanne EBORI, Libreville
  • 2 Department of Pediatric University of Health Sciences, Owendo
  • 3 CHU- Mère-Enfant, Fondation Jeanne EBORI, Libreville
  • 4 Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, Libreville
  • 5 CHU de Libreville, Gabon
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Public Health in Africa
Publisher
PAGEPress Publications, Pavia, Italy
Publication Date
Jun 18, 2021
Volume
12
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4081/jphia.2021.1075
PMID: 34249293
PMCID: PMC8239449
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background Nosocomial infection outbreaks in neonatal services are a serious healthcare concern in both developed and developing countries, but few studies have been conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective This study explored the etiology of septicemia in neonates and associated patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in Gabon. Methods We analyzed cultures from neonates’ blood and swabs from medical personnel and equipment located in the neonatology service. Results Sixty-eight microorganisms were isolated from the medical personnel and equipment; 46 microorganisms were isolated from neonates’ blood culture. Klebsiella pneumoniae spp pneumonia e was the most common bacteria found in both (30.6% and 26.9%, respectively). All Klebsiella pneumoniae spp pneumonia isolates were resistant to amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, gentamycin resistance ranged from 93% to 100%, and cephalosporin resistance ranged from 33.3% to 47%. Conclusions: Awareness of the etiology, prevalence, and outcome of nosocomial infection is the first and most important step to appropriate interventions.

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