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Production of long-chain hydroxy fatty acids by Starmerella bombicola.

Authors
  • De Graeve, Marilyn1
  • Van de Velde, Isabelle1
  • Saey, Lien1
  • Chys, Maarten1
  • Oorts, Hanne1
  • Kahriman, Hümeyra1
  • Mincke, Stein2
  • Stevens, Christian2
  • De Maeseneire, Sofie L1
  • Roelants, Sophie L K W1
  • Soetaert, Wim K G1
  • 1 Department of Biotechnology, Centre for Industrial Biotechnology and Biocatalysis (InBio.be), Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 2 Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
FEMS Yeast Research
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/femsyr/foz067
PMID: 31598679
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To decrease our dependency for the diminishing source of fossils resources, bio-based alternatives are being explored for the synthesis of commodity and high-value molecules. One example in this ecological initiative is the microbial production of the biosurfactant sophorolipids by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. Sophorolipids are surface-active molecules mainly used as household and laundry detergents. Because S. bombicola is able to produce high titers of sophorolipids, the yeast is also used to increase the portfolio of lipophilic compounds through strain engineering. Here, the one-step microbial production of hydroxy fatty acids by S. bombicola was accomplished by the selective blockage of three catabolic pathways through metabolic engineering. Successful production of 17.39 g/l (ω-1) linked hydroxy fatty acids was obtained by the successive blockage of the sophorolipid biosynthesis, the β-oxidation and the ω-oxidation pathways. Minor contamination of dicarboxylic acids and fatty aldehydes were successfully removed using flash chromatography. This way, S. bombicola was further expanded into a flexible production platform of economical relevant compounds in the chemical, food and cosmetic industries. © FEMS 2019.

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