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Priorities for science to overcome hurdles thwarting the full promise of the 'digital agriculture' revolution.

Authors
  • Shepherd, Mark1
  • Turner, James A1
  • Small, Bruce1
  • Wheeler, David1
  • 1 Farm Systems and Environment Group, AgResearch Ltd, Ruakura Research Centre, Hamilton, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2020
Volume
100
Issue
14
Pages
5083–5092
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jsfa.9346
PMID: 30191570
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The world needs to produce more food, more sustainably, on a planet with scarce resources and under changing climate. The advancement of technologies, computing power and analytics offers the possibility that 'digitalisation of agriculture' can provide new solutions to these complex challenges. The role of science is to evidence and support the design and use of digital technologies to realise these beneficial outcomes and avoid unintended consequences. This requires consideration of data governance design to enable the benefits of digital agriculture to be shared equitably and how digital agriculture could change agricultural business models; that is, farm structures, the value chain and stakeholder roles, networks and power relations, and governance. We argue that this requires transdisciplinary research (at pace), including explicit consideration of the aforementioned socio-ethical issues, data governance and business models, alongside addressing technical issues, as we now have to simultaneously deal with multiple interacting outcomes in complex technical, social, economic and governance systems. The exciting prospect is that digitalisation of science can enable this new, and more effective, way of working. The question then becomes: how can we effectively accelerate this shift to a new way of working in agricultural science? As well as identifying key research areas, we suggest organisational changes will be required: new research business models, agile project management; new skills and capabilities; and collaborations with new partners to develop 'technology ecosystems'. © 2018 The Authors. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

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