Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Primary central nervous system lymphoma in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: case-based review.

Authors
  • Ichikawa, Takanori1
  • Shimojima, Yasuhiro2
  • Kishida, Dai1
  • Kaneko, Tomoki3
  • Sekijima, Yoshiki1
  • 1 Department of Medicine (Neurology and Rheumatology), Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Department of Medicine (Neurology and Rheumatology), Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621, Japan. [email protected] , (Japan)
  • 3 Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Rheumatology International
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
41
Issue
5
Pages
1009–1017
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00296-020-04569-6
PMID: 32253501
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) sometimes occurs in immune-compromised hosts or patients with autoimmune diseases. Some cohort studies have previously reported an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), while some cases of PCNSL in patients with SLE were reported. We present the case of PCNSL which developed in a patient with the active phase of neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). Furthermore, we reviewed published English articles to confirm the characteristics of PCNSL related to SLE. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PCNSL occurring in NPSLE. Histology demonstrated B-cell lymphoma with a positive Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA. This patient recovered following surgical resection of the lymphoma, whole brain radiation therapy, intravenous infusion of rituximab (RTX), and administration of belimumab after RTX. Given the series of reviews, our report suggests that the persistence of damage in the central nervous system (CNS) and long-term exposure to immunosuppressants may impact oncogenic immune responses within the CNS, leading to PCNSL development.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times