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Prevalence and situational causes of stereotyped behaviors in blind infants and preschoolers.

Authors
  • Tröster, H
  • Brambring, M
  • Beelmann, A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of abnormal child psychology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1991
Volume
19
Issue
5
Pages
569–590
Identifiers
PMID: 1770186
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Parents of 85 blind children aged from 10 months to the 6th year of life were asked regarding the frequency, duration and typical situations of the occurrence of various stereotypic behaviors in their children. The Bielefeld Parents' Questionnaire for Blind and Sighted Infants and Preschoolers was used as the instrument of measurement. All of the children displayed at least one stereotypic behavior; most displayed several stereotypic behaviors according to the parents' reports. Eye poking and body rocking dominated within the prevalence hierarchy. Four typical situations could be identified in which stereotypic behaviors were shown: monotony, arousal, demand, and during feeding or eating. The results suggested that repetitive hand and finger movements, stereotypic manipulation of objects, and making a face(s) mainly occur within arousal situations whereas eye poking, whimpering, and sucking thumbs or fingers especially are linked to monotony.

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