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The prevalence and risk factors of psychological disturbances of frontline medical staff in china under the COVID-19 epidemic: Workload should be concerned.

Authors
  • Zhou, Yongjie1
  • Wang, Wenjuan2
  • Sun, Yanping2
  • Qian, Wei3
  • Liu, Zhengkui3
  • Wang, Ruoxi4
  • Qi, Ling5
  • Yang, Jiezhi6
  • Song, Xiuli7
  • Zhou, Xin8
  • Zeng, Lingyun1
  • Liu, Tiebang1
  • Li, Zezhi9
  • Zhang, Xiangyang10
  • 1 Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Guangdong, Shenzhen, China. , (China)
  • 2 Qingdao Mental Health Center, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China. , (China)
  • 3 CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. , (China)
  • 4 School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. , (China)
  • 5 School of Health Science and Nursing, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan, China. , (China)
  • 6 Shenzhen Health Development Research Center, Shenzhen, China. , (China)
  • 7 Clinical psychology, Yantai Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, China. , (China)
  • 8 Research Center for Psychological and Health Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China. , (China)
  • 9 Department of Neurology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 10 Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Guangdong, Shenzhen, China; School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of affective disorders
Publication Date
Aug 26, 2020
Volume
277
Pages
510–514
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.08.059
PMID: 32882508
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To our best knowledge, this was the first time to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of psychological disturbances, including depression, anxiety, somatization symptoms, insomnia and suicide, among frontline medical staff, who were working with the COVID-10 infected patients directly. Patient Health Questionnaire Depression (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire scale (GAD-7), Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) somatization, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and the suicidal module of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview were used for online survey. A total of 606 frontline hospital staff and1099 general population were recruited. The prevalence of depression, anxiety, somatization symptoms, insomnia, and suicide risk in frontline medical staffs were 57.6%, 45.4%, 12.0%, 32.0% and 13.0%, respectively. Except for suicide risk, the prevalence of other psychological disorders in frontline medical staff were higher than those in general population (all p<0.01). Among the frontline medical staff, the daily working hours were associated with all psychological disturbance (all p<0.01), women with anxiety (p = 0.02), body mass index (BMI) with anxiety and insomnia (p = 0.02, p = 0.03). Age was negatively associated with depression, anxiety, and insomnia (all p<0.01). Finally, years of working and family income were negatively associated with suicide risk (p = 0.03, p<0.001). Our study demonstrates that during the outbreak of COVID-19, the frontline medical staff are more likely to suffer from psychological disturbances than general population. It is noticeable that daily working hours are a risk factor for all measured psychological disturbances, and some other variables may be involved in certain psychological disturbances of frontline medical staff. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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