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PREVALENCE AND PARASITE COMPOSITION OF GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES IN THE ENDANGERED TIBETAN ANTELOPE (PANTHOLOPS HODGSONII) FROM THE CALVING GROUND OF HOH XIL NATURAL WORLD HERITAGE SITE, QINGHAI, CHINA.

Authors
  • Cao, Yifan1, 2
  • Yang, Yuangang1, 3
  • Duszynski, Donald W4
  • Zhu, Yahui1, 2
  • Shang, Guozhen1, 3
  • Hou, Chu1, 3
  • Zhang, Tongzuo1, 2
  • Bian, Jianghui1, 2
  • 1 Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 2 Qinghai Key Laboratory of Animal Ecological Genomics, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 3 University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 4 Biology Professor Emeritus, 76 Homesteads Rd., Placitas, New Mexico 87043, USA. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of wildlife diseases
Publication Date
Nov 21, 2019
Identifiers
PMID: 31750770
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Our objective was to provide baseline information on the gastrointestinal parasites of the female Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii) on its calving ground at the Zhuonai Lake region, in the Hoh Xil Natural World Heritage site, Qinghai, China. On 3 July 2018, 238 freshly deposited fecal samples were collected from the calving grounds and analyzed by flotation technique to recover eggs, oocysts, and nematode larvae. All fecal samples demonstrated the presence of gastrointestinal parasites: 93% (221/238) had nematodes, 36% (86/238) had cestodes, and 99% (235/238) had coccidian oocysts. For each Tibetan antelope, mean (SD) parasite species richness was 3.4 (1.3). Coinfections with five parasite genera were found in 19% (45/238) of fecal samples. These results showed that prevalence of Trichostrongylus, Marshallagia, and Eimeria infections in these Tibetan antelopes were sufficiently high to suggest long-term monitoring be implemented because the climate there is becoming warmer and moisture is increasing, both presumably due to the influence of global warming which, in turn, may be contributing to increased infection risks with these parasites.

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