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Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in Hawassa University students’ clinic, Southern Ethiopia: a 10-year retrospective study

Authors
  • Menjetta, Tadesse1
  • Simion, Teketel2
  • Anjulo, Wondimu2
  • Ayele, Kidist2
  • Haile, Mekides2
  • Tafesse, Tewodros2
  • Asnake, Solomon1
  • 1 Hawassa University College of Health Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory, Hawassa, Ethiopia , Hawassa (Ethiopia)
  • 2 Hawassa Health Center, Hawassa, Ethiopia , Hawassa (Ethiopia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Research Notes
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Oct 28, 2019
Volume
12
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-019-4747-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among patients who had attended Hawassa University students’ clinic, Southern Ethiopia.ResultOver the 10 years period, a total of 13,679 patients visiting Hawassa University students’ clinic were included in the study. A total of 6553 (47.9%) patients were positive for at least one intestinal parasite. The overall prevalence of intestinal helminth and protozoan infections was 20.3% and 27.6% respectively. There were four dual infections and one triple infection. E. histolytica/E. dispar trophozoite was the most common identified parasite, which was seen in 18% of the patients while Enterobius vermicularis (0.1%) was the least reported parasite. Other parasites identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (15.0%), Hookworm species (2.0%), Taenia species (1.8%), Hymenolepis nana (0.7%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.3%), Trichuris trichuria (0.2%), and Shistosoma mansoni (0.2%). The prevalence of helminthes was higher in females (23.3%) than in males (19.5%) (P < 0.00001) while that of protozoan infections was 28.5% in males than females (23.8%) (574/2414) (P < 0.00001).

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