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Prevalence and characteristics of incident falls related to nocturnal toileting in hospitalized patients.

Authors
  • Decalf, Veerle1
  • Bower, Wendy1, 2, 3
  • Rose, Georgie2
  • Petrovic, Mirko4
  • Pieters, Ronny5
  • Eeckloo, Kristof6
  • Everaert, Karel1, 5
  • 1 Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Human Structure and Repair, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 2 Department of Medicine and Aged Care, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 5 Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 6 Department of Strategic Policy Cell, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta clinica Belgica
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
76
Issue
2
Pages
85–90
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/17843286.2019.1660022
PMID: 31478467
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objectives: Although nocturia is a risk factor for incident falls in the community, studies are required to gain an understanding of incident falls related to nocturnal toileting in hospitals. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of incident falls in adult hospitalized patients related to nocturnal toileting.Methods: A retrospective review of the electronic incident reporting and learning system and medical records of inpatients that had an incident fall.Results: The prevalence of toileting-related incident falls was 53% (73/137) and 28% of all incident falls were related to nocturnal toileting.Intravenous fluid infusion was associated with falls related to toileting, whereby median perfusion volume during night-time was 375 ml [IQR: 225-578 ml].Conclusions: The prevalence of nocturnal toileting-related incident falls in hospitals is high. Nocturia could be a leading cause of these incident falls. Intravenous fluid infusion might be part of the aetiology of (iatrogenic) nocturia.

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