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The Prevalence of ADHD in a Population-Based Sample.

Authors
  • Rowland, Andrew S1
  • Skipper, Betty J2
  • Umbach, David M3
  • Rabiner, David L4
  • Campbell, Richard A2
  • Naftel, Albert J5
  • Sandler, Dale P3
  • 1 University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA [email protected] , (Mexico)
  • 2 University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA. , (Mexico)
  • 3 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH, Dept. of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
  • 4 Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
  • 5 University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Attention Disorders
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2015
Volume
19
Issue
9
Pages
741–754
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1087054713513799
PMID: 24336124
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Few studies of ADHD prevalence have used population-based samples, multiple informants, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) criteria. Moreover, children who are asymptomatic while receiving ADHD medication often have been misclassified. Therefore, we conducted a population-based study to estimate the prevalence of ADHD in elementary school children using DSM-IV criteria. We screened 7,587 children for ADHD. Teachers of 81% of the children completed a DSM-IV checklist. We then interviewed parents using a structured interview (DISC). Of these, 72% participated. Parent and teacher ratings were combined to determine ADHD status. We also estimated the proportion of cases attributable to other conditions. Overall, 15.5% of our sample met DSM- (4th ed.; text rev., DSM-IV-TR) criteria for ADHD (95% CI [14.6%, 16.4%]); 42% of cases reported no previous diagnosis. With additional information, other conditions explained 9% of cases. The prevalence of ADHD in this population-based sample was considerably higher than 3% to 7%. To compare study results, the DSM criteria need standardization. © 2013 SAGE Publications.

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