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Press Ideology as an Epistemological Connector between Framing Theory and Social Representations Theory: An Analysis of Violence and Drug Trafficking in the Mexican Press.

Authors
  • Reyes-Sosa, Hiram1
  • Egilegor, Maider Larrañaga2
  • Dos Santos, Tânia3
  • Perez-Marin, Luisa4
  • Alvarez-Montero, Francisco5
  • 1 Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. [email protected] , (Italy)
  • 2 University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 ISCTE-IUL, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, CIS-IUL, Lisbon, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 4 Universidad de Manizales, Manizales, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 5 Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Culiacán, Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Integrative psychological & behavioral science
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
54
Issue
1
Pages
179–195
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12124-019-09498-z
PMID: 31325103
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present paper explores the advantages of using framing theory, social representations theory and differences in ideology to analyze polarized issues in the press. Framing uncovers the structure/format of news articles and social representations explores their meanings. These two theoretical positions are connected through the concept of ideology - a set of beliefs that shape position taking regarding social issues. Using this integrated framework, we will analyze the highly polarized topic of violence and drug trafficking in two ideologically different newspapers in Sinaloa, Mexico - Noroeste (journalistic ideology) and El Debate (elite ideology) (total N = 547 articles). This will be accomplished using three steps - a descriptive analysis, application of the framing scale and submitting the articles to ALCESTE software. The results show differences in framing and social representations of violence and drug trafficking according to ideology. Each newspaper presented different news frames (journalistic - attribution of responsibility and conflict frames; elite - human-interest and morality frames). However, at the level of representations (content) there were ideological differences in the representation of violence but not of drug trafficking, suggesting a common element in these representations, beyond ideological differences. These findings contribute to (1) the clarification of the concept used and (2) towards an analytical framework of press analysis - analyzing format and content and considering differences in press ideology.

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