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Preserved network functional connectivity underlies cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis.

Authors
  • Fuchs, Tom A1, 2
  • Benedict, Ralph H B1
  • Bartnik, Alexander1, 2
  • Choudhery, Sanjeevani1, 2
  • Li, Xian1, 2
  • Mallory, Matthew1, 2
  • Oship, Devon1, 2
  • Yasin, Faizan1
  • Ashton, Kira1, 2
  • Jakimovski, Dejan1, 2
  • Bergsland, Niels1, 2
  • Ramasamy, Deepa P1, 2
  • Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca1
  • Zivadinov, Robert1, 2, 3
  • Dwyer, Michael G1, 2
  • 1 Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, New York.
  • 2 Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, New York.
  • 3 Center for Biomedical Imaging, Clinical Translational Science Institute, University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, New York.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human Brain Mapping
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2019
Volume
40
Issue
18
Pages
5231–5241
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/hbm.24768
PMID: 31444887
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cognitive reserve is one's mental resilience or resistance to the effects of structural brain damage. Reserve effects are well established in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and Alzheimer's disease, but the neural basis of this phenomenon is unclear. We aimed to investigate whether preservation of functional connectivity explains cognitive reserve. Seventy-four PwMS and 29 HCs underwent neuropsychological assessment and 3 T MRI. Structural damage measures included gray matter (GM) atrophy and network white matter (WM) tract disruption between pairs of GM regions. Resting-state functional connectivity was also assessed. PwMS exhibited significantly impaired cognitive processing speed (t = 2.14, p = .037) and visual/spatial memory (t = 2.72, p = .008), and had significantly greater variance in functional connectivity relative to HCs within relevant networks (p < .001, p < .001, p = .016). Higher premorbid verbal intelligence, a proxy for cognitive reserve, predicted relative preservation of functional connectivity despite accumulation of GM atrophy (standardized-β = .301, p = .021). Furthermore, preservation of functional connectivity attenuated the impact of structural network WM tract disruption on cognition (β = -.513, p = .001, for cognitive processing speed; β = -.209, p = .066, for visual/spatial memory). The data suggests that preserved functional connectivity explains cognitive reserve in PwMS, helping to maintain cognitive capacity despite structural damage. © 2019 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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