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PRES secondary to autonomic dysreflexia: A case series and review of the literature.

Authors
  • Hubbard, Molly E1
  • Phillips, Aaron A2
  • Charbonneau, Rebecca3
  • Squair, Jordan W4
  • Parr, Ann M1
  • Krassioukov, Andrei4
  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • 2 Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alberta, Calgary, AB, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The journal of spinal cord medicine
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
4
Pages
606–612
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/10790268.2019.1616146
PMID: 31140946
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Context: Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a complex syndrome seen in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) and can be life-threatening with a significant negative impact on the health of the individual. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is thought to be caused, in part, by rapid elevations in blood pressure; leading to posterior cerebral circulatory edema. This can result in seizures, blindness and can progress to fatal intracranial hemorrhages.Findings: Here we present two cases of patients with SCI who developed PRES from AD. Each patient was correctly diagnosed, leading to appropriate treatment of the factors leading to their AD and subsequent resolution of their PRES symptoms.Conclusions/Clinical Relevance: In SCI patients who present with new seizures, visual deficits, or other neurologic signs, PRES should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis as a good outcome relies on rapid recognition and treatment of AD.

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