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Prenatal resident-intruder stress decreases levels of allopregnanolone in the cortex, hypothalamus, and midbrain of males, and increases levels in the hippocampus and cerebellum of female, juvenile rat offspring.

Authors
  • Torgersen, Jennifer K1
  • Petitti, Rose1
  • Tello, Sedric1
  • Lembo, Vincent F1
  • Frye, Cheryl A1
  • 1 University at Albany - State University of New York, Comprehensive Neuropsychological Services, Albany, NY, 12203, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurobiology of stress
Publication Date
May 01, 2020
Volume
12
Pages
100214–100214
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ynstr.2020.100214
PMID: 32258257
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Prenatal stress (PNS) can influence behaviors associated with cognition, reward and emotional regulation, which are controlled by brain areas such as the cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain and cerebellum. Allopregnanolone in these regions modulates behavioral and parasympathetic effects. The current study tested whether exposing pregnant dams to 5 days of resident-intruder stress on prenatal days 15-20 for 10 min altered the levels of allopregnanolone in cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, and cerebellum of male and female juvenile offspring. In cortex, hypothalamus, and midbrain of male rats exposed to prenatal stress, levels of allopregnanolone were significantly lower compared to all other groups. In the hippocampus and cerebellum, among females exposed to prenatal stress levels were significantly higher compared to all other groups. These differences in allopregnanolone levels varying by prenatal stress, sex and brain regions provide insight in potential mechanism of stress regulation and etiopathophysiology of stress-related disorders. © 2020 The Authors.

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