Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Preliminary paleohistological observations of the StW 573 ('Little Foot') skull.

Authors
  • Beaudet, Amélie1, 2, 3, 4
  • Atwood, Robert C5
  • Kockelmann, Winfried6
  • Fernandez, Vincent7
  • Connolley, Thomas5
  • Vo, Nghia Trong5
  • Clarke, Ronald8
  • Stratford, Dominic2
  • 1 Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 3 Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 Department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 5 Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 6 STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Harwell, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 7 Core Research Laboratories, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 8 Evolutionary Studies Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. , (South Africa)
Type
Published Article
Journal
eLife
Publisher
"eLife Sciences Organisation, Ltd."
Publication Date
Mar 02, 2021
Volume
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.64804
PMID: 33648628
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Numerous aspects of early hominin biology remain debated or simply unknown. However, recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have opened new avenues in the field of paleoanthropology. More specifically, X-ray synchrotron-based analytical imaging techniques have the potential to provide crucial details on the ontogeny, physiology, biomechanics, and biological identity of fossil specimens. Here we present preliminary results of our X-ray synchrotron-based investigation of the skull of the 3.67-million-year-old Australopithecus specimen StW 573 ('Little Foot') at the I12 beamline of the Diamond Light Source (United Kingdom). Besides showing fine details of the enamel (i.e., hypoplasias) and cementum (i.e., incremental lines), as well as of the cranial bone microarchitecture (e.g., diploic channels), our synchrotron-based investigation reveals for the first time the 3D spatial organization of the Haversian systems in the mandibular symphysis of an early hominin. © 2021, Beaudet et al.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times