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Predictors of viral suppression among youth living with HIV in the southern United States.

Authors
  • Tarantino, Nicholas1, 2
  • Whiteley, Laura2
  • Craker, Lacey1
  • Brown, Larry K1, 2
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
7
Pages
916–920
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2019.1668529
PMID: 31544473
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Youth living with HIV (YLH) in the United States (U.S.) face significant problems with achieving viral suppression, especially in the South. To examine this issue, YLH with a detectable viral load (N = 61) were recruited from the southern U.S and assessed over 16 weeks for health and treatment factors. Participants were part of a smartphone-based intervention trial. Analyses focused on predictors of viral suppression controlling for intervention effects. Fifty-three percent achieved suppression. In univariate models, YLH who engaged in condomless sex four to 16 weeks into the study (odds ratio [OR] = 4.00; compared to those who did not) and self-reported ≥ 90% antiretroviral adherence in the first four weeks of the study (OR = 25.00; compared to youth with <90%) had a higher likelihood of suppression. Shifts in adherence-related social support (OR = 4.98) and appointments kept (OR = 2.72) were also associated with suppression. YLH endorsing illicit drug use had a lower likelihood of suppression (OR = 0.16; compared to those without use). Effects (except drug use) remained significant or approached significance in a multivariate model. Adherence promotion efforts should consider this population's adherence-related social support, drug use, and risk for sexually transmitted infections.

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