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Predictors of Physical Therapy Referral Among Persons With Peripheral Vestibular Disorders in the United States.

Authors
  • Dunlap, Pamela M1
  • Khoja, Samannaaz S2
  • Whitney, Susan L3
  • Freburger, Janet K2
  • 1 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • 3 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
101
Issue
10
Pages
1747–1753
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2020.04.016
PMID: 32445851
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To determine the rate of physical therapy (PT) referral and patient and physician characteristics associated with PT referral for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and other peripheral vestibular disorders (PVD) in ambulatory care clinics in the United States. Cross-sectional analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 2004-2015 SETTING: Ambulatory care clinics in the United States. We identified 5.6 million weighted adult visits for BPPV (International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision-Clinical Modifications (ICD-9-CM): 386.11) and 6.6 million weighted visits for other PVDs (ICD-9-CM: 386.1-386.9, excluding 386.11 and 386.2) made by patients 18 years and older from 2004 through 2015. Not applicable. Patient, clinical, and physician characteristics were extracted, and descriptive statistics were stratified by referral to PT. Two multivariable logistic regression models were estimated for each diagnostic group (BPPV and other PVDs) to identify predictors of PT referral. PT referrals for BPPV increased from 6.2% in the period from 2004 to 2006 to 12.9% in the period from 2013 to 2015, whereas PT referrals for other PVDs decreased from 3.8% in the period from 2004 to 2006 to 0.5% in the period from 2013 to 2015. Other insurance coverage (versus private) and neurologists and other specialists (versus otolaryngologists) were associated with a greater odds of PT referral for BPPV. Visits made in the Midwest and West (versus the Northeast) and in rural versus metropolitan areas had greater odds of PT referral for BPPV. Relative to otolaryngologists, primary care physicians were less likely to refer to PT for other PVDs. Visits made in metropolitan versus rural areas and visits with 1 or more comorbidities (versus none) had greater odds of PT referral for other PVDs. PT referrals remain low for ambulatory care visits for BPPV and other PVDs in the United States. Referral to PT for BPPV and other PVDs varied by insurance type, physician specialty, and office location. Copyright © 2020 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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