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Predictors of Perceived Discrimination in Medical Settings Among Muslim Women in the USA.

Authors
  • Murrar, Sohad1, 2, 3
  • Baqai, Benish4, 5
  • Padela, Aasim I6, 4, 5, 7
  • 1 Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. [email protected].
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. [email protected].
  • 3 Initiative On Islam and Medicine, Brookfield, WI, USA. [email protected].
  • 4 Initiative On Islam and Medicine, Brookfield, WI, USA.
  • 5 Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
  • 6 Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
  • 7 Center for Bioethics and the Medical Humanities, Institute for Health and Equity, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
11
Issue
1
Pages
150–156
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s40615-022-01506-0
PMID: 36622571
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Minority groups based on immigration status, gender, or religion often face discrimination in healthcare settings. Muslim women, especially those who wear hijab, are more likely to experience stereotyping and discrimination in and outside of healthcare, but little is known about the sociodemographic predictors of this discrimination. We examined sociodemographic factors and religiosity as predictors of discrimination in medical settings among Muslim American women. Muslim women (n = 254) were recruited from Muslim organizations in Chicago to self-administer a survey on perceived discrimination, religiosity, and sociodemographic characteristics. Many participants reported that they were treated with less courtesy than non-Muslims (25.4%) and that a doctor or nurse did not listen to them (29.8%) or acted as though they were not smart (24.3%). A multivariable regression model revealed that self-rated religiosity was negatively associated with discrimination. Race/ethnicity trended towards predicting perceived discrimination such that Arabs and South Asians reported less discrimination than African Americans. The current study sheds light on the important role of religiosity in shaping Muslim women's experiences in medical settings and points to the buffering effect of religiosity and the additive consequences of racial/ethnic identity in experiences of religious discrimination. © 2023. W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute.

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