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Predictive value of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in the diagnosis and outcomes of acute aortic syndromes.

Authors
  • AlMahameed, Soufian T1
  • Novaro, Gian M2
  • Asher, Craig R2
  • Hougthaling, Penny L3
  • Lago, Rodrigo M2
  • Bhatt, Deepak L4
  • AlMahameed, Amjad T5
  • Topol, Eric J6
  • 1 Carilion Clinic and Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, Virginia, USA.
  • 2 Department of Cardiology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida, USA.
  • 3 Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
  • 4 VA Boston Healthcare System, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 5 Interventional Cardiology and Vascular Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. , (Israel)
  • 6 The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, California, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Heart Asia
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2010
Volume
2
Issue
1
Pages
136–139
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/ha.2010.002881
PMID: 27325965
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels differ among patients with acute aortic syndromes (AAS) and if hsCRP could predict their long-term outcomes. Retrospective observational study. Cleveland Clinic Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. 115 consecutive patients with AAS admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit. HsCRP and other laboratory data were measured within 24 h of admission. Demographic, imaging and laboratory data were obtained at the time of presentation. For the long-term survival analysis, the social security death index was used to determine all-cause mortality. HsCRP levels among AAS patients. Hospital mortality was 4.3% for AAS patients. HsCRP levels differed significantly among AAS; the median hsCRP was higher in the aortic dissection group (49 mg/l) than in those with penetrating aortic ulcer (28 mg/l), symptomatic aortic aneurysm (14 mg/l), and intramural haematoma (10 mg/l); (p=0.02). In multivariable analysis, aortic dissection patients had higher hsCRP levels than intramural haematoma (p=0.03) and symptomatic aortic aneurysm (p=0.04) patients, after adjusting for age and gender. Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed that elevated hsCRP levels at presentation were associated with a higher long-term mortality (p=0.007). Among patients with AAS, those with aortic dissection have the highest hsCRP levels at presentation. Elevated hsCRP independently predicted a higher long-term mortality in AAS patients.

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