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A possible role of the glomus cell in controlling vascular tone of the carotid labyrinth of Xenopus laevis.

Authors
  • Kusakabe, T
  • Ishii, K
  • Ishii, K
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine
Publication Date
Apr 01, 1987
Volume
151
Issue
4
Pages
395–408
Identifiers
PMID: 3617052
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

To clarify the physiological significance of the g-s connection (intimate apposition of the glomus cell to the smooth muscle) in the Xenopus carotid labyrinth, experiments were carried out morphologically and physiologically. Results obtained are as follows. Efferent electrical stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve resulted in concentrating dense-cored vesicles on the peripheral region of the glomus cell, and a decrease of vesicles as a whole. In the carotid labyrinth perfused artificially, outflow of the internal and the external carotid arteries decreased with administration of catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine). Acetylcholine reduced only the internal outflow. This response was depressed by atropine, hexamethonium and phentolamine, whereas accelerated by propranolol. Sodium cyanide reduced the internal outflow without affecting the external outflow, and its effect is depressed by phentolamine. From these results, a possibility that the glomus cell participates in controlling the blood flow in the labyrinth through the intervention of the g-s connection was discussed.

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