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Population effects and variability.

Authors
  • Dorne, Jean Lou
  • Amzal, Billy
  • Bois, Frédéric
  • Crépet, Amélie
  • Tressou, Jessica
  • Verger, Philippe
Type
Published Article
Journal
Methods in Molecular Biology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2012
Volume
929
Pages
521–581
Identifiers
PMID: 23007442
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Chemical risk assessment for human health requires a multidisciplinary approach through four steps: hazard identification and characterization, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Hazard identification and characterization aim to identify the metabolism and elimination of the chemical (toxicokinetics) and the toxicological dose-response (toxicodynamics) and to derive a health-based guidance value for safe levels of exposure. Exposure assessment estimates human exposure as the product of the amount of the chemical in the matrix consumed and the consumption itself. Finally, risk characterization evaluates the risk of the exposure to human health by comparing the latter to with the health-based guidance value. Recently, many research efforts in computational toxicology have been put together to characterize population variability and uncertainty in each of the steps of risk assessment to move towards more quantitative and transparent risk assessment. This chapter focuses specifically on modeling population variability and effects for each step of risk assessment in order to provide an overview of the statistical and computational tools available to toxicologists and risk assessors. Three examples are given to illustrate the applicability of those tools: derivation of pathway-related uncertainty factors based on population variability, exposure to dioxins, dose-response modeling of cadmium.

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