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[Pleuropulmonary staphylococcal infection in infants, in a hospital environment in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

Authors
  • Sawadogo, A
  • Koueta, F
  • Sanou, I
  • Kam, K L
  • Dao, L
  • Reinhardt, M
  • Queloz, J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Santé (Montrouge, France)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1999
Volume
9
Issue
4
Pages
209–213
Identifiers
PMID: 10623866
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We observed 36 cases of pleuropulmonary staphylococcal infection (PPS) in infants aged 0 to 30 months, during a prospective study carried out between April 1st 1995 and March 31 1996 at the Pediatrics Department of Ouagadougou University Hospital. PPS accounted for 0.5% of all hospital admissions and 11.6% of all acute basal respiratory infections in children aged less than 30 months. Slightly more boys than girls were affected, with a sex ratio of 1.2. We identified the classic triad of symptoms: cough-fever-polypnea, associated with abdominal ballooning and a change in general condition. On X rays, the typical images showing parenchymatous bubbles were the second most frequent observation (27.8%) after parenchymatous opacities (69.5%). The most frequently used antibiotics were oxacillin (Bristopen), gentamycin (Gentallin) and cefuroxime-axetil (Zinnat). The prognosis of PPS is poor, with a high mortality rate (27.8%) and a risk of pleural recurrence. Being very young, late hospitalization, malnutrition and leukopenia were identified as factors indicating a poor prognosis. Recygling of health care personnel for the management of acute respiratory infections, a decrease in malnutrition and an improvement in vaccination cover are essential if the mortality and morbidity of acute respiratory infections, and PPS in particular, are to be reduced.

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