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Plasma protein(s)-based conceptual diagnostic tool for assessing high-altitude acclimation in humans.

Authors
  • Paul, Subhojit1
  • Gangwar, Anamika1
  • Bhargava, Kalpana1
  • Khan, Nilofar1
  • Khurana, Pankaj1
  • Ahmad, Yasmin2
  • 1 Defence R&D Organization (DRDO), Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences (DIPAS), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, New Delhi, 110054, India. , (India)
  • 2 Defence R&D Organization (DRDO), Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences (DIPAS), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, New Delhi, 110054, India. [email protected] , (India)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Functional & integrative genomics
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
20
Issue
2
Pages
191–200
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10142-019-00712-0
PMID: 31444657
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Exposure to high altitude above 3000 m leads to two outcomes-acclimation or high-altitude maladies. To reach a particular outcome, the plasma proteome is modified differentially, either in context of an acclimation response or mal-acclimation response leading to disease. This ensures that hypoxia-responsive plasma protein trends reflect acclimation in acclimated individuals when compared with their levels prior to acclimation. Such protein trends could be used to assess acclimation in an individual and any significant deviation from this trend may indicate non-acclimation, thereby preventing high-altitude illnesses before they manifest. In this study, we investigate and statistically evaluate the trendlines of various hypoxia-responsive plasma protein levels, reported significantly perturbed in our previous studies, in individuals (male; n = 20) exposed to 3520 m at high-altitude day 1 (HAD1), HAD4, and HAD7L and to 4420 m at HAD7H, HAD30, and HAD120. We observe that thioredoxin (Trx), glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx-3), and apolipoprotein AI (Apo-AI) are statistically robust markers to assess acclimation across the exposure duration while sulfotransferase 1A1 (ST1A1) is a capable negative control whose levels increase only in cases of HAPE. We also observe exposure day-specific and resident altitude-specific proteins capable of accurately assessing acclimation when compared with baseline levels or the lower altitude zone.

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