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Plasma disappearance of creatinine as a renal function test in the dog.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Research in Veterinary Science
0034-5288
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
50
Issue
3
Pages
253–258
Identifiers
PMID: 1882132
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The serum concentration of creatinine at 120 minutes (SC120) after intravenous injection of 88 mg kg-1 of creatinine, the plasma half-life (t1/2) and the plasma clearance of creatinine (PCC) were evaluated as renal function tests in 30 healthy adult dogs and six adult dogs with known or suspected renal disease. The mean SC120 in the normal dog was 0.31 +/- 0.08 mmol litre-1 and in the clinical cases 0.71 +/- 0.19 mmol litre-1. The correlation coefficients between SC120 and renal creatinine clearance (RCC) for the normal dogs and the clinical cases were -0.76 and -0.69, respectively. At 120 minutes after injection, 95 per cent of normal dogs would be predicted to have a serum creatinine concentration below 0.46 mmol litre-1. The mean plasma t1/2 of creatinine for the normal dogs was 107.7 +/- 17.96 minutes, while the clinical cases had a wide range of values (148.8 to 620.1 minutes). Plasma t1/2 of creatinine was correlated with RCC for both the normal dogs and the clinical cases (r = -0.55, r = -0.91, respectively). The mean PCC for the normal dogs was 7.42 +/- 2.22 ml min-1 kg-1 (range 4.95 to 13.28 ml min-1 kg-1). There was a good correlation between RCC and PCC (r = 0.7). The PCC for the clinical cases ranged from 0.76 to 3.37 ml min-1 kg-1. The correlation between RCC and PCC was significant (r = 0.91). Thus SC120, t1/2 and PCC may be useful methods of assessing renal function in dogs with renal impairment insufficient to cause azotaemia.

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