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A pilot randomised test of a self-affirmation implementation intention intervention to reduce dietary salt intake.

Authors
  • Bradbury, Daisy1
  • Upsher, Rebecca1
  • Chilcot, Joseph1
  • 1 Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of health psychology
Publication Date
May 01, 2018
Volume
23
Issue
6
Pages
765–775
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1359105316650511
PMID: 27216984
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Self-affirmation may reduce defensive processing towards health messages. We tested the effects of a self-affirmation implementation intentional intervention with regard to salt risk message acceptance, estimates of daily-recommended intake and self-reported intake. Participants ( n = 65) who consumed over 6 g/day of salt were randomised into three conditions: self-affirmation, self-affirming implementation intention and control. Participants attended the laboratory and completed a 2-week follow-up. There was no effect of the condition on message acceptance, salt estimation and 2-week salt intake. Across conditions, 2-week salt intake was reduced. We found no evidence for either intervention with regard to salt risk message acceptance and behaviour change.

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