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Pilot Outcomes of a Multicomponent Fall Risk Program Integrated Into Daily Lives of Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

Authors
  • Szanton, Sarah L1, 2
  • Clemson, Lindy3
  • Liu, Minhui1
  • Gitlin, Laura N4
  • Hladek, Melissa D1
  • LaFave, Sarah E1
  • Roth, David L5
  • Marx, Katherine A1
  • Felix, Cynthia2
  • Okoye, Safiyyah M1, 2
  • Zhang, Xuan1
  • Bautista, Svetlana1
  • Granbom, Marianne6
  • 1 Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 2 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 3 The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
  • 5 Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 6 Lund University, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of applied gerontology : the official journal of the Southern Gerontological Society
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
40
Issue
3
Pages
320–327
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0733464820912664
PMID: 32193981
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate whether a fall prevention intervention reduces fall risk in older adults who have previously fallen. Design: Randomized controlled pilot trial. Setting: Participants' homes. Intervention: LIVE-LiFE, adapted from Lifestyle-Intervention Functional Exercise (LiFE) integrates strength and balance training into daily habits in eight visits over 12 weeks. The adaptations to LiFE were to also provide (a) US$500 in home safety changes, (b) vision contrast screening and referral, and (c) medication recommendations. Control condition consisted of fall prevention materials and individualized fall risk summary. Measurement: Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Tandem stand. Falls efficacy, feasibility, and acceptability of the intervention. Results: Sample (N = 37) was 65% female, 65% White, and average 77 years. Compared with the control group, each outcome improved in the intervention. The LIVE-LiFE intervention had a large effect (1.1) for tandem stand, moderate (0.5) in falls efficacy, and small (0.1) in the TUG. Conclusion: Simultaneously addressing preventable fall risk factors is feasible.

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