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Physiological arousal and observed behaviour in parent-child interactions involving young children with Down syndrome.

Authors
  • Lorang, E1, 2
  • Hartley, S3, 2
  • Sterling, A1, 2
  • 1 Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
  • 2 Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
  • 3 Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
64
Issue
6
Pages
426–433
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jir.12714
PMID: 31971300
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Parents of children with Down syndrome (DS) play an important role in their child's development. Physiological measures, such as electrodermal activity (EDA), can shed light on parent-child relations beyond the behavioural level. The goals of the current study were to assess the feasibility of collecting EDA data in preschool age children with DS, examine the association between parent and child EDA during play-based interactions, and investigate the relation between parent and child EDA and observed parent behaviours. Two parents in 15 families participated in dyadic free play interactions with their child with DS (i.e., 15 mother-child and 15 father-child interactions). The children with DS (aged 24-61 months) and both of their parents wore multisensory wristbands measuring EDA. Parent behaviours were coded as requests for behavioural complies, requests for verbal complies, or comments. Usable EDA data were collected for 13/15 children and 11/15 mothers during the mother-child interactions and 14/15 children and 12/15 fathers during the father-child interactions. Parent and child EDA variability was significantly positively related for father-child but not mother-child dyads. Maternal use of requests for behavioural complies was positively related to child EDA variability. The collection of EDA data through wristbands worn by young children with DS during early parent-child interactions was feasible. Preliminary findings indicated that some aspects of parent and child physiology in DS may be related in different ways for mother-child and father-child dyads. © 2020 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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