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Physical Body Orientation Impacts Virtual Navigation Experience and Performance.

Authors
  • Moon, Hyuk-June1, 2, 3
  • Wu, Hsin-Ping1, 2
  • De Falco, Emanuela1, 2
  • Blanke, Olaf4, 2, 5
  • 1 Neuro-X Institute, Faculty of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), CH-1202 Geneva, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 2 Brain Mind Institute, Faculty of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 3 Bionics Research Center, Biomedical Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Neuro-X Institute, Faculty of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), CH-1202 Geneva, Switzerland [email protected]. , (Switzerland)
  • 5 Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
eneuro
Publisher
Society for Neuroscience
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2023
Volume
10
Issue
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0218-23.2023
PMID: 37932043
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Most human navigation studies in MRI rely on virtual navigation. However, the necessary supine position in MRI makes it fundamentally different from daily ecological navigation. Nonetheless, until now, no study has assessed whether differences in physical body orientation (BO) affect participants' experienced BO during virtual navigation. Here, combining an immersive virtual reality navigation task with subjective BO measures and implicit behavioral measures, we demonstrate that physical BO (either standing or supine) modulates experienced BO. Also, we show that standing upright BO is preferred during spatial navigation: participants were more likely to experience a standing BO and were better at spatial navigation when standing upright. Importantly, we report that showing a supine virtual agent reduces the conflict between the preferred BO and physical supine BO. Our study provides critical, but missing, information regarding experienced BO during virtual navigation, which should be considered cautiously when designing navigation studies, especially in MRI. Copyright © 2023 Moon et al.

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