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Photosynthesis, Leaf Anatomy, and Cellular Constituents in the Polyploid C(4) Grass Panicum virgatum.

Authors
  • Warner, D A
  • Ku, M S
  • Edwards, G E
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologists
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1987
Volume
84
Issue
2
Pages
461–466
Identifiers
PMID: 16665462
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Photosynthetic gas exchange, activities of six key C(4) cycle enzymes, amounts of soluble protein, chlorophyll, and DNA, and various leaf anatomical and structural features were measured in naturally occurring tetraploid and octaploid plants of the NAD-malic enzyme type C(4) grass Panicum virgatum L. On a leaf area basis, the photosynthetic rate and concentrations of DNA, soluble protein, and chlorophyll were 40 to 50% higher, and enzyme activities 20 to 70% higher in the octaploid than in the tetraploid. Photosynthetic cells in the octaploid were only 17 to 19% larger in volume, yet contained 33 to 38% more chloroplasts than cells in the tetraploid. On a per cell basis the contents of DNA, soluble protein, and chlorophyll, activities of carboxylating photosynthetic enzymes, and carbon assimilation rate were all doubled in octaploid compared with tetraploid cells. Since cellular volume did not double with genome doubling, cellular constituents were more concentrated in the cells of the octaploid. The influences of polyploidy were balanced between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells since the changes in physical and biochemical parameters with ploidy level were similar in both cell types. We conclude that photosynthetic activity in these two polyploid genotypes of P. virgatum is determined by enzyme activities and concentrations of biochemical constituents, and that selection for smaller cell volume has led to higher photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area in the octaploid. The ratio of DNA content to cellular volume is a major factor determining the concentrations of gene products in cells. The number of chloroplasts, however, is controlled more by cellular volume than by the number of nuclear chromosomes.

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