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Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides can selectively alter neuronal activity in the cochlea.

Authors
  • LeBlanc, C S
  • Fallon, M
  • Parker, M S
  • Skellett, R
  • Bobbin, R P
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hearing research
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1999
Volume
135
Issue
1-2
Pages
105–112
Identifiers
PMID: 10491959
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A growing body of evidence indicates that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) may have a major role in cochlear function. Antagonists of ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2) have significant effects on cochlear potentials and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). We tested whether antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) would mimic the functional deficiencies induced by the ATP antagonists through binding to P2X2 ATP receptor mRNA and thereby reduce the number of ATP receptors expressed in the membrane of the cells. Both a phosphorothioate ODN (S-ODN) antisense and a phosphodiester ODN (P-ODN) antisense to the P2X2 sequence and random sense ODNs containing 21 nucleotides were administered chronically (7 days) to the guinea pig cochlea via the perilymph compartment. Sound evoked cochlear potentials (cochlear microphonic; summating potential; compound action potential of the auditory nerve, CAP; latency of the first negative peak in the CAP, N1 latency) and DPOAEs were monitored to assess the effects of the ODNs. Results indicate that the phosphorothioate derivatives of both the antisense and random sense ODNs suppressed the CAP and prolonged the N1 latency with no significant effect on the other parameters. The P-ODNs had no effect. Since both the antisense and random sense S-ODNs had the same effect, we conclude that the S-ODNs affected neuronal function in a manner that did not involve binding to the ATP receptor mRNA.

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